Technology

Trends 360

Man, Machine, and Creativity

Trends360

Robots, AI, automation—many jobs will change as a result of these technologies. Some may even disappear. But if history is right, most changes will be good ones.

Between 1982 and 2012 employment grew significantly faster in occupations that embraced the use of computers. As automation eliminated routine, repetitive work, humans had more time to do what machines can’t do—creative work. The future will need everyone to unleash their creative potential to solve complex problems, make new connections and generate ideas. The future is creative.

TECHNOLOGY: PROMISE OR PERIL?

52%

    Activities people are paid to do in the world’s workforce that could potentially be automated by current technologies.

42%

Percentage of jobs predicted to be transformed by digitalization in France in the next 10 years.

5%

Less than 5% of all occupations an be entirely automated.

 

REGIONAL JOB IMPACT FROM AUTOMATION IN THE NEXT 15 YEARS

 

A LEADER’S PERSPECTIVE

77%

   CEOs concerned that key skill shortages could impair their company’s growth.

61%

   Leaders that don’t believe their company is very creative.

52%

   CEOs that plan to hire more employees, but the skills they consider most important are those that can’t be replicated by machines.

 

THE CREATIVITY GAP

42%

of employees say their company measures productivity by how much work they produce.

34%

of employees say their company measures productivity by how creative their ideas are.

77%

   Workers who believe creativity will be a critical job skill in the future.

65%

   Employees who say they are not living up to their creative potential.

40%

   Employees who say their company has a culture that encourages creativity.

 


By 2020, more than 1/3 of the desired core skill sets of most occupations will be comprised of skills that are not yet considered crucial to the job.

65% of kids entering school today are going to be doing jobs that currently don’t exist.


Sources: (1) McKinsey Global Institute analysis (2) UK Economic Outlook, PwC, 201Think Act, Les Classes (3) Moy- ennes Face à La Transformation Digitale, Roland Berge Strategy Consultants, 2014, (4) 20th CEO Survey, PwC, 2017, (5) Adobe State of Create 2016 (6) 20th CEO Survey, PwC, 2017 (7) 20th CEO Survey, PwC, 2017, Sources: (8) Steelcase Creativity and the Future of Work Survey, 2017 (9) Adobe State of Create 2016 (10) Steelcase Creativity and the Future of Work Survey, 2017, (11) The Future of Work Report, World Economic Forum, 2017, (12) McKinsey Global Institute Analysis

Trends 360

What Workers Want

Steelcase_Trends_2017_111417

What workers want

People know what they don’t want at work—a sea of bland, uni-form spaces where ideas go to die. In fact, a recent Steelcase study of global office workers found that although 77 percent of people have their own assigned workstation, the vast majority— 87 percent—spend two to four hours every day working some-place else. We wanted to know: Why are people migrating away from their desks? What kinds of spaces are they looking for? Is it as simple as adding some sofas and a barista bar to give people the kind of workplace they want?

As it turns out, monotony is a huge motivator—just over half of people (51%) say they need an escape from working in the same place during their day, whether they were alone or with others. They’re also seeking deeper relationships with colleagues, and 43 percent believe informal spaces can help build more trust.

DESIRE VS. REALITY

People give lackluster scores to the informal spaces their companies provide today: General Satisfaction Score -2.25; Ability to Support Work -2.46. (1= extremely satisfied; 5= extremely dissatisfied)

Digging deeper we saw what’s behind the ho-hum ratings:

THE MORE THE BETTER

It shouldn’t come as a surprise: Companies that offer more casual, inspiring spaces are perceived as being significantly more progressive than those who don’t.

THE AGE FACTOR

Younger and older generations agree—everyone likes informal spaces and use them regularly—but for different reasons. Millen-nials are more likely to use dining/bar spaces to do focus work while older generations use these spaces for collaboration and socialization. Lounge spaces are used by millennials as a place for privacy while older generations use these spaces socially.

Millenials are also more likely to use a wider range of informal spaces and to adjust their furniture, where older employees tend to pick favorite spots use and leave their furniture settings alone.

CULTURE SHIFT

In China and India, people spend far less time at their primary workstation than in other countries. Organizations appear to be more progressive and provide more informal spaces to their employees.

India and China also offer the lowest percentage of I/Owned workstations and the highest percentage of We/Owned and We/Shared workspaces. This further promotes mobility in the workplace and people in these countries are more likely to seek out other spaces to work.

Organizations in the United States and Germany appear to be more traditional and provide considerably more I/Owned workstations; organizations in India and China are more progressive and offer more We spaces.

OFFICE NEEDS

According to the study, most organizations provide people with the technology and permission to work in informal spaces. But what’s missing is the range of spaces where people want to work that support their physical, cognitive and emotional wellbeing.

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